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Archive for August, 2012

Can Your Student See the Blackboard – or Rather, Whiteboard at School?

Vision and LearningRemember when teachers used to write with chalk on blackboards? Today, those blackboards, chalk and erasers have been largely replaced with whiteboards, markers and Power Point presentations.

The question parents and teachers ask their students still remains just about the same:

“Are you having any trouble seeing the blackboard whiteboard at school?”

Parents and teachers know vision plays a vital role in a student’s ability to learn.  In today’s technology driven world, a student’s reliance on clear vision for learning is greater than ever. Research studies show a direct link between vision and a student’s performance in the classroom.

More Information Learned Visually

Various research studies conducted in educational theory show that visual learning is among the very best methods for teaching students of all ages how to learn.

According to the research, students remember information at a much higher rate when that information is presented visually.

Visual Clarity Improves Learning 

Studies also show that visual clarity of the information being studied greatly impacts the ease at which it is learned and the attitude of the student.  Students have a positive approach to the information if they can see it clearly and easily. This has huge implications on learning. A student’s feelings and perceptions about learning determine the student’s level of motivation, comprehension and retention. Crisp and clear vision is critical for optimal academic performance. If a student has a vision problem, they are likely to be frustrated with school and develop a poor attitude towards their education.

Color Vision for Whiteboards and Computer Screens

The increasing use of whiteboards and Power Point presentations in the classroom allow teachers to use a wide variety of colors in their teaching. If a student has an issue with their color vision (color blindness), they may not be able to see or distinguish important parts of the teacher’s presentation. This can have a significant impact on understanding a teaching lesson and learning. Boys are more likely to have issues with color vision than girls.

Importance of Regular Eye Exams

Academic performance is yet another reason why attending regular scheduled eye exams are so important. Talk to your eye doctor about your child’s academic performance and whether they are having trouble seeing the information presented to them in the classroom. It can be surprising how well a student’s grades improve when vision problems are corrected.

Learn more about quality eye care and eye wear from a company and a team of eye care professionals who have been providing a superior level of service for more than 35 years. Please visit www.shawneeoptical.com. While on the website, notice the special eyeglass frames offered just for children. Shawnee Optical’s KidSpecs program provides kids of all ages with hundreds of frames choices. After all, kids want to look good too!

Macular Degeneration Can Be Wet or Dry

Macular DegenerationMacular degeneration is an eye condition where the macula area of the retina begins to breakdown and deteriorates.  The macula is a small part of the overall retina, but is critical to central vision and seeing small details. The macula is the part of the retina that allows you to use your sight for such tasks as reading a computer screen, viewing a text message or setting the cooking time on the microwave oven.   The remaining part of the retina is called the peripheral retina. This part of the retina gives you side or peripheral vision.

Many people develop macular degeneration as they age into the senior years of life. There are various macular related eye problems, but age-related macular degeneration or AMD is the most common.

Causes and Symptoms of Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration usually does not affect side or peripheral vision. However, it does impact central vision. Symptoms of macular degeneration may include blurred central vision, dark areas in central vision or loss of central vision.

Macular degeneration is normally caused by the formation of deposits under the retina or the growth of abnormal blood vessels under the retina.

There are two types of macular degeneration:  dry macular degeneration and wet macular degeneration.

Dry Macular Degeneration

The dry form of macular degeneration is the most common.  Deposits form under the retina causing the tissues of the macula to become thin and stop working properly.  With dry macular degeneration, the loss of vision is typically a slow and gradual process.

Wet Macular Degeneration

The more problematic type of macular degeneration is wet macular degeneration. It can cause significant damage to central vision.  Wet macular degeneration is a condition where abnormal blood vessels develop under the retina. These blood vessels can leak fluid or blood and distort vision. Loss of vision from wet macular degeneration is usually much faster and more noticeable than dry macular degeneration.

Importance of Regular Eye Exams for Detecting Macular Degeneration 

Many people who develop macular degeneration are not aware of this eye condition until they start to notice vision problems.  Diagnosing macular degeneration early is vital to preserving central vision. It’s one of the many reasons why scheduling and attending regular eye exams as recommended by your eye doctor are so important.

Learn more about quality eye care and eye wear from a company and a team of eye care professionals who have been providing a superior level of service for more than 35 years. Please visit www.shawneeoptical.com.

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